• 7E Reviews Frends Taylor Headphones 
In addition to our engineering/art blog, we also own and operate a Los Angeles based pro audio company Meris.  Terry is an electronic engineer, founder and musician.  Our partner, Angelo is a DSP Engineer with 15+ years of experience in the pro audio world.  I decided to do an honest review of high end audio accessory company geared towards women.  Our assessment is from the best audio engineers/designers in the field.  
When I stumbled upon Frends Taylor Headphones, I was stunned by its beauty.  I consulted my husband Terry to discern the sound quality through online reviews.  But we couldn’t find a single constructive review about the audio quality.  I figured I’d fill that void.  
Verdict:
Quality - The quality and craftsmanship is superb.  Leather is soft and the stitching is clean and tight.  With interchangeable headphone caps, my gold headphones look high quality.  Slightly heavy feel.  Truly is a jewelry inspired design. Designed in Los Angeles and made in China.  
Sound - Full, rich and robust in bass.  I find it a bit bassy and louder than my Sony Pro MCR-7506.  Fun with R&B or Rap but not quite a balanced equalization for all types of music.  
Comfort - Not nearly as comfortable as my Sonys that I’ve had for 8 years. The Taylors do not cup over my ears but rather smash my earlobes.  Ear set is made of memory foam and adjusts in length however this does not ease the slight tension. I find this to be one of the key deciding factors.  
Features - Includes a built in 3 button mic for volume, music + phone control with thin soft fabric cord.  Comes with a zippered carrying case and jewelry box packaging.  Made for all Apple IOS products however not sure how it works well with Android devices.  
Fashion over Function is the question.  The sound quality is good however comfort scores lowest.  Similar to sexy look of high heels, I’d say it’s worth the slight discomfort in this case.  
-Jinna
  • 7E Reviews Frends Taylor Headphones 
In addition to our engineering/art blog, we also own and operate a Los Angeles based pro audio company Meris.  Terry is an electronic engineer, founder and musician.  Our partner, Angelo is a DSP Engineer with 15+ years of experience in the pro audio world.  I decided to do an honest review of high end audio accessory company geared towards women.  Our assessment is from the best audio engineers/designers in the field.  
When I stumbled upon Frends Taylor Headphones, I was stunned by its beauty.  I consulted my husband Terry to discern the sound quality through online reviews.  But we couldn’t find a single constructive review about the audio quality.  I figured I’d fill that void.  
Verdict:
Quality - The quality and craftsmanship is superb.  Leather is soft and the stitching is clean and tight.  With interchangeable headphone caps, my gold headphones look high quality.  Slightly heavy feel.  Truly is a jewelry inspired design. Designed in Los Angeles and made in China.  
Sound - Full, rich and robust in bass.  I find it a bit bassy and louder than my Sony Pro MCR-7506.  Fun with R&B or Rap but not quite a balanced equalization for all types of music.  
Comfort - Not nearly as comfortable as my Sonys that I’ve had for 8 years. The Taylors do not cup over my ears but rather smash my earlobes.  Ear set is made of memory foam and adjusts in length however this does not ease the slight tension. I find this to be one of the key deciding factors.  
Features - Includes a built in 3 button mic for volume, music + phone control with thin soft fabric cord.  Comes with a zippered carrying case and jewelry box packaging.  Made for all Apple IOS products however not sure how it works well with Android devices.  
Fashion over Function is the question.  The sound quality is good however comfort scores lowest.  Similar to sexy look of high heels, I’d say it’s worth the slight discomfort in this case.  
-Jinna
  • 7E Reviews Frends Taylor Headphones 
In addition to our engineering/art blog, we also own and operate a Los Angeles based pro audio company Meris.  Terry is an electronic engineer, founder and musician.  Our partner, Angelo is a DSP Engineer with 15+ years of experience in the pro audio world.  I decided to do an honest review of high end audio accessory company geared towards women.  Our assessment is from the best audio engineers/designers in the field.  
When I stumbled upon Frends Taylor Headphones, I was stunned by its beauty.  I consulted my husband Terry to discern the sound quality through online reviews.  But we couldn’t find a single constructive review about the audio quality.  I figured I’d fill that void.  
Verdict:
Quality - The quality and craftsmanship is superb.  Leather is soft and the stitching is clean and tight.  With interchangeable headphone caps, my gold headphones look high quality.  Slightly heavy feel.  Truly is a jewelry inspired design. Designed in Los Angeles and made in China.  
Sound - Full, rich and robust in bass.  I find it a bit bassy and louder than my Sony Pro MCR-7506.  Fun with R&B or Rap but not quite a balanced equalization for all types of music.  
Comfort - Not nearly as comfortable as my Sonys that I’ve had for 8 years. The Taylors do not cup over my ears but rather smash my earlobes.  Ear set is made of memory foam and adjusts in length however this does not ease the slight tension. I find this to be one of the key deciding factors.  
Features - Includes a built in 3 button mic for volume, music + phone control with thin soft fabric cord.  Comes with a zippered carrying case and jewelry box packaging.  Made for all Apple IOS products however not sure how it works well with Android devices.  
Fashion over Function is the question.  The sound quality is good however comfort scores lowest.  Similar to sexy look of high heels, I’d say it’s worth the slight discomfort in this case.  
-Jinna

7E Reviews Frends Taylor Headphones 

In addition to our engineering/art blog, we also own and operate a Los Angeles based pro audio company Meris.  Terry is an electronic engineer, founder and musician.  Our partner, Angelo is a DSP Engineer with 15+ years of experience in the pro audio world.  I decided to do an honest review of high end audio accessory company geared towards women.  Our assessment is from the best audio engineers/designers in the field.  

When I stumbled upon Frends Taylor Headphones, I was stunned by its beauty.  I consulted my husband Terry to discern the sound quality through online reviews.  But we couldn’t find a single constructive review about the audio quality.  I figured I’d fill that void.  

Verdict:

Quality - The quality and craftsmanship is superb.  Leather is soft and the stitching is clean and tight.  With interchangeable headphone caps, my gold headphones look high quality.  Slightly heavy feel.  Truly is a jewelry inspired design. Designed in Los Angeles and made in China.  

Sound - Full, rich and robust in bass.  I find it a bit bassy and louder than my Sony Pro MCR-7506.  Fun with R&B or Rap but not quite a balanced equalization for all types of music.  

Comfort - Not nearly as comfortable as my Sonys that I’ve had for 8 years. The Taylors do not cup over my ears but rather smash my earlobes.  Ear set is made of memory foam and adjusts in length however this does not ease the slight tension. I find this to be one of the key deciding factors.  

Features - Includes a built in 3 button mic for volume, music + phone control with thin soft fabric cord.  Comes with a zippered carrying case and jewelry box packaging.  Made for all Apple IOS products however not sure how it works well with Android devices.  

Fashion over Function is the question.  The sound quality is good however comfort scores lowest.  Similar to sexy look of high heels, I’d say it’s worth the slight discomfort in this case.  

-Jinna

  • 7E Studio Highlight:  Random International 
Random International is a London-based studio that focuses on digital media, interactive art and installation.  Rain Room invites visitors to leisurely walk through falling water without getting soaked.  Hidden sensors follow human motion and create a controlled area of dryness.  The powerful sound of pouring rain envelopes as you experience virtual mother nature.  There’s something soothing about watching rain in the comfort and safety of your home.  This takes that experience to an impressive level.  In Rain Room, the rain clouds will part for you.
Watch the dance choreography in Rain Room.  
Photos by:  Random International.  
-7E
  • 7E Studio Highlight:  Random International 
Random International is a London-based studio that focuses on digital media, interactive art and installation.  Rain Room invites visitors to leisurely walk through falling water without getting soaked.  Hidden sensors follow human motion and create a controlled area of dryness.  The powerful sound of pouring rain envelopes as you experience virtual mother nature.  There’s something soothing about watching rain in the comfort and safety of your home.  This takes that experience to an impressive level.  In Rain Room, the rain clouds will part for you.
Watch the dance choreography in Rain Room.  
Photos by:  Random International.  
-7E
  • 7E Studio Highlight:  Random International 
Random International is a London-based studio that focuses on digital media, interactive art and installation.  Rain Room invites visitors to leisurely walk through falling water without getting soaked.  Hidden sensors follow human motion and create a controlled area of dryness.  The powerful sound of pouring rain envelopes as you experience virtual mother nature.  There’s something soothing about watching rain in the comfort and safety of your home.  This takes that experience to an impressive level.  In Rain Room, the rain clouds will part for you.
Watch the dance choreography in Rain Room.  
Photos by:  Random International.  
-7E
  • 7E Studio Highlight:  Random International 
Random International is a London-based studio that focuses on digital media, interactive art and installation.  Rain Room invites visitors to leisurely walk through falling water without getting soaked.  Hidden sensors follow human motion and create a controlled area of dryness.  The powerful sound of pouring rain envelopes as you experience virtual mother nature.  There’s something soothing about watching rain in the comfort and safety of your home.  This takes that experience to an impressive level.  In Rain Room, the rain clouds will part for you.
Watch the dance choreography in Rain Room.  
Photos by:  Random International.  
-7E
  • 7E Studio Highlight:  Random International 
Random International is a London-based studio that focuses on digital media, interactive art and installation.  Rain Room invites visitors to leisurely walk through falling water without getting soaked.  Hidden sensors follow human motion and create a controlled area of dryness.  The powerful sound of pouring rain envelopes as you experience virtual mother nature.  There’s something soothing about watching rain in the comfort and safety of your home.  This takes that experience to an impressive level.  In Rain Room, the rain clouds will part for you.
Watch the dance choreography in Rain Room.  
Photos by:  Random International.  
-7E
  • 7E Studio Highlight:  Random International 
Random International is a London-based studio that focuses on digital media, interactive art and installation.  Rain Room invites visitors to leisurely walk through falling water without getting soaked.  Hidden sensors follow human motion and create a controlled area of dryness.  The powerful sound of pouring rain envelopes as you experience virtual mother nature.  There’s something soothing about watching rain in the comfort and safety of your home.  This takes that experience to an impressive level.  In Rain Room, the rain clouds will part for you.
Watch the dance choreography in Rain Room.  
Photos by:  Random International.  
-7E
  • 7E Studio Highlight:  Random International 
Random International is a London-based studio that focuses on digital media, interactive art and installation.  Rain Room invites visitors to leisurely walk through falling water without getting soaked.  Hidden sensors follow human motion and create a controlled area of dryness.  The powerful sound of pouring rain envelopes as you experience virtual mother nature.  There’s something soothing about watching rain in the comfort and safety of your home.  This takes that experience to an impressive level.  In Rain Room, the rain clouds will part for you.
Watch the dance choreography in Rain Room.  
Photos by:  Random International.  
-7E
  • 7E Studio Highlight:  Random International 
Random International is a London-based studio that focuses on digital media, interactive art and installation.  Rain Room invites visitors to leisurely walk through falling water without getting soaked.  Hidden sensors follow human motion and create a controlled area of dryness.  The powerful sound of pouring rain envelopes as you experience virtual mother nature.  There’s something soothing about watching rain in the comfort and safety of your home.  This takes that experience to an impressive level.  In Rain Room, the rain clouds will part for you.
Watch the dance choreography in Rain Room.  
Photos by:  Random International.  
-7E
  • 7E Studio Highlight:  Random International 
Random International is a London-based studio that focuses on digital media, interactive art and installation.  Rain Room invites visitors to leisurely walk through falling water without getting soaked.  Hidden sensors follow human motion and create a controlled area of dryness.  The powerful sound of pouring rain envelopes as you experience virtual mother nature.  There’s something soothing about watching rain in the comfort and safety of your home.  This takes that experience to an impressive level.  In Rain Room, the rain clouds will part for you.
Watch the dance choreography in Rain Room.  
Photos by:  Random International.  
-7E
  • 7E Studio Highlight:  Random International 
Random International is a London-based studio that focuses on digital media, interactive art and installation.  Rain Room invites visitors to leisurely walk through falling water without getting soaked.  Hidden sensors follow human motion and create a controlled area of dryness.  The powerful sound of pouring rain envelopes as you experience virtual mother nature.  There’s something soothing about watching rain in the comfort and safety of your home.  This takes that experience to an impressive level.  In Rain Room, the rain clouds will part for you.
Watch the dance choreography in Rain Room.  
Photos by:  Random International.  
-7E

7E Studio Highlight:  Random International 

Random International is a London-based studio that focuses on digital media, interactive art and installation.  Rain Room invites visitors to leisurely walk through falling water without getting soaked.  Hidden sensors follow human motion and create a controlled area of dryness.  The powerful sound of pouring rain envelopes as you experience virtual mother nature.  There’s something soothing about watching rain in the comfort and safety of your home.  This takes that experience to an impressive level.  In Rain Room, the rain clouds will part for you.

Watch the dance choreography in Rain Room.  

Photos by:  Random International.  

-7E

  • 7E Guest Artist - Daniel Palacios
Daniel Palacios is a multimedia artist with a Masters degree in Art and Technology from Cordoba, Spain.  He creates machines that stir questions about perception, memory, moments, time and space.  When I discovered his installation called Waves, I was enamored by it’s intrinsic beauty which reminds me of audio or ocean waves.  Two machines are programmed to hold long pieces of rope and create unique movements reacting to it’s environment.  
“The installation is affected by those who watch it. When the audience moves around it they influence the movements of the rope, generating visual and acoustic sound waves from harmonic patterns to complex ones. Depending on how we may act in front of it, according to the number of observers and their movements, it will pass from a steady line without sound to chaotic shapes of irregular sounds (the more movement there is around the installation) through the different phases of sinusoidal waves and harmonic sounds; examining the action-reaction principle applied to sound and space.”
Watch his vimeo.  
-7E
  • 7E Guest Artist - Daniel Palacios
Daniel Palacios is a multimedia artist with a Masters degree in Art and Technology from Cordoba, Spain.  He creates machines that stir questions about perception, memory, moments, time and space.  When I discovered his installation called Waves, I was enamored by it’s intrinsic beauty which reminds me of audio or ocean waves.  Two machines are programmed to hold long pieces of rope and create unique movements reacting to it’s environment.  
“The installation is affected by those who watch it. When the audience moves around it they influence the movements of the rope, generating visual and acoustic sound waves from harmonic patterns to complex ones. Depending on how we may act in front of it, according to the number of observers and their movements, it will pass from a steady line without sound to chaotic shapes of irregular sounds (the more movement there is around the installation) through the different phases of sinusoidal waves and harmonic sounds; examining the action-reaction principle applied to sound and space.”
Watch his vimeo.  
-7E
  • 7E Guest Artist - Daniel Palacios
Daniel Palacios is a multimedia artist with a Masters degree in Art and Technology from Cordoba, Spain.  He creates machines that stir questions about perception, memory, moments, time and space.  When I discovered his installation called Waves, I was enamored by it’s intrinsic beauty which reminds me of audio or ocean waves.  Two machines are programmed to hold long pieces of rope and create unique movements reacting to it’s environment.  
“The installation is affected by those who watch it. When the audience moves around it they influence the movements of the rope, generating visual and acoustic sound waves from harmonic patterns to complex ones. Depending on how we may act in front of it, according to the number of observers and their movements, it will pass from a steady line without sound to chaotic shapes of irregular sounds (the more movement there is around the installation) through the different phases of sinusoidal waves and harmonic sounds; examining the action-reaction principle applied to sound and space.”
Watch his vimeo.  
-7E
  • 7E Guest Artist - Daniel Palacios
Daniel Palacios is a multimedia artist with a Masters degree in Art and Technology from Cordoba, Spain.  He creates machines that stir questions about perception, memory, moments, time and space.  When I discovered his installation called Waves, I was enamored by it’s intrinsic beauty which reminds me of audio or ocean waves.  Two machines are programmed to hold long pieces of rope and create unique movements reacting to it’s environment.  
“The installation is affected by those who watch it. When the audience moves around it they influence the movements of the rope, generating visual and acoustic sound waves from harmonic patterns to complex ones. Depending on how we may act in front of it, according to the number of observers and their movements, it will pass from a steady line without sound to chaotic shapes of irregular sounds (the more movement there is around the installation) through the different phases of sinusoidal waves and harmonic sounds; examining the action-reaction principle applied to sound and space.”
Watch his vimeo.  
-7E
  • 7E Guest Artist - Daniel Palacios
Daniel Palacios is a multimedia artist with a Masters degree in Art and Technology from Cordoba, Spain.  He creates machines that stir questions about perception, memory, moments, time and space.  When I discovered his installation called Waves, I was enamored by it’s intrinsic beauty which reminds me of audio or ocean waves.  Two machines are programmed to hold long pieces of rope and create unique movements reacting to it’s environment.  
“The installation is affected by those who watch it. When the audience moves around it they influence the movements of the rope, generating visual and acoustic sound waves from harmonic patterns to complex ones. Depending on how we may act in front of it, according to the number of observers and their movements, it will pass from a steady line without sound to chaotic shapes of irregular sounds (the more movement there is around the installation) through the different phases of sinusoidal waves and harmonic sounds; examining the action-reaction principle applied to sound and space.”
Watch his vimeo.  
-7E
  • 7E Guest Artist - Daniel Palacios
Daniel Palacios is a multimedia artist with a Masters degree in Art and Technology from Cordoba, Spain.  He creates machines that stir questions about perception, memory, moments, time and space.  When I discovered his installation called Waves, I was enamored by it’s intrinsic beauty which reminds me of audio or ocean waves.  Two machines are programmed to hold long pieces of rope and create unique movements reacting to it’s environment.  
“The installation is affected by those who watch it. When the audience moves around it they influence the movements of the rope, generating visual and acoustic sound waves from harmonic patterns to complex ones. Depending on how we may act in front of it, according to the number of observers and their movements, it will pass from a steady line without sound to chaotic shapes of irregular sounds (the more movement there is around the installation) through the different phases of sinusoidal waves and harmonic sounds; examining the action-reaction principle applied to sound and space.”
Watch his vimeo.  
-7E
  • 7E Guest Artist - Daniel Palacios
Daniel Palacios is a multimedia artist with a Masters degree in Art and Technology from Cordoba, Spain.  He creates machines that stir questions about perception, memory, moments, time and space.  When I discovered his installation called Waves, I was enamored by it’s intrinsic beauty which reminds me of audio or ocean waves.  Two machines are programmed to hold long pieces of rope and create unique movements reacting to it’s environment.  
“The installation is affected by those who watch it. When the audience moves around it they influence the movements of the rope, generating visual and acoustic sound waves from harmonic patterns to complex ones. Depending on how we may act in front of it, according to the number of observers and their movements, it will pass from a steady line without sound to chaotic shapes of irregular sounds (the more movement there is around the installation) through the different phases of sinusoidal waves and harmonic sounds; examining the action-reaction principle applied to sound and space.”
Watch his vimeo.  
-7E
  • 7E Guest Artist - Daniel Palacios
Daniel Palacios is a multimedia artist with a Masters degree in Art and Technology from Cordoba, Spain.  He creates machines that stir questions about perception, memory, moments, time and space.  When I discovered his installation called Waves, I was enamored by it’s intrinsic beauty which reminds me of audio or ocean waves.  Two machines are programmed to hold long pieces of rope and create unique movements reacting to it’s environment.  
“The installation is affected by those who watch it. When the audience moves around it they influence the movements of the rope, generating visual and acoustic sound waves from harmonic patterns to complex ones. Depending on how we may act in front of it, according to the number of observers and their movements, it will pass from a steady line without sound to chaotic shapes of irregular sounds (the more movement there is around the installation) through the different phases of sinusoidal waves and harmonic sounds; examining the action-reaction principle applied to sound and space.”
Watch his vimeo.  
-7E
  • 7E Guest Artist - Daniel Palacios
Daniel Palacios is a multimedia artist with a Masters degree in Art and Technology from Cordoba, Spain.  He creates machines that stir questions about perception, memory, moments, time and space.  When I discovered his installation called Waves, I was enamored by it’s intrinsic beauty which reminds me of audio or ocean waves.  Two machines are programmed to hold long pieces of rope and create unique movements reacting to it’s environment.  
“The installation is affected by those who watch it. When the audience moves around it they influence the movements of the rope, generating visual and acoustic sound waves from harmonic patterns to complex ones. Depending on how we may act in front of it, according to the number of observers and their movements, it will pass from a steady line without sound to chaotic shapes of irregular sounds (the more movement there is around the installation) through the different phases of sinusoidal waves and harmonic sounds; examining the action-reaction principle applied to sound and space.”
Watch his vimeo.  
-7E
  • 7E Guest Artist - Daniel Palacios
Daniel Palacios is a multimedia artist with a Masters degree in Art and Technology from Cordoba, Spain.  He creates machines that stir questions about perception, memory, moments, time and space.  When I discovered his installation called Waves, I was enamored by it’s intrinsic beauty which reminds me of audio or ocean waves.  Two machines are programmed to hold long pieces of rope and create unique movements reacting to it’s environment.  
“The installation is affected by those who watch it. When the audience moves around it they influence the movements of the rope, generating visual and acoustic sound waves from harmonic patterns to complex ones. Depending on how we may act in front of it, according to the number of observers and their movements, it will pass from a steady line without sound to chaotic shapes of irregular sounds (the more movement there is around the installation) through the different phases of sinusoidal waves and harmonic sounds; examining the action-reaction principle applied to sound and space.”
Watch his vimeo.  
-7E

7E Guest Artist - Daniel Palacios

Daniel Palacios is a multimedia artist with a Masters degree in Art and Technology from Cordoba, Spain.  He creates machines that stir questions about perception, memory, moments, time and space.  When I discovered his installation called Waves, I was enamored by it’s intrinsic beauty which reminds me of audio or ocean waves.  Two machines are programmed to hold long pieces of rope and create unique movements reacting to it’s environment.  

The installation is affected by those who watch it. When the audience moves around it they influence the movements of the rope, generating visual and acoustic sound waves from harmonic patterns to complex ones. Depending on how we may act in front of it, according to the number of observers and their movements, it will pass from a steady line without sound to chaotic shapes of irregular sounds (the more movement there is around the installation) through the different phases of sinusoidal waves and harmonic sounds; examining the action-reaction principle applied to sound and space.”

Watch his vimeo.  

-7E

  • Alberto Tadiello joins us on 7E
Alberto is an Italian audio/electronic installation artist. He creates various autonomous sonic machines and installations that at some point undergo a climactic state. ”I’m interested in creating a physical experience without implicating a physical contact,” he says. “What I want is to make something epidermic that borders visual and auditory sensations, becoming nearly tactile.” Alberto also uses aspects of sound like echo and resonance in his work. He says he wants people to “bring along the residue of what they saw, heard, and felt” after they experience his art.
EPROMs (Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) is an installation consisting of wiring, transformers and electric motors which drive music boxes. Like the limited use memory chips that inspired it’s name, the art piece eventually wears out and changes over time, starting out as a “fairy-like” soundscape and eventually disintegrating into a cacophony of worn out mechanics.
-terrytwitter.com/7Electrons
  • Alberto Tadiello joins us on 7E
Alberto is an Italian audio/electronic installation artist. He creates various autonomous sonic machines and installations that at some point undergo a climactic state. ”I’m interested in creating a physical experience without implicating a physical contact,” he says. “What I want is to make something epidermic that borders visual and auditory sensations, becoming nearly tactile.” Alberto also uses aspects of sound like echo and resonance in his work. He says he wants people to “bring along the residue of what they saw, heard, and felt” after they experience his art.
EPROMs (Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) is an installation consisting of wiring, transformers and electric motors which drive music boxes. Like the limited use memory chips that inspired it’s name, the art piece eventually wears out and changes over time, starting out as a “fairy-like” soundscape and eventually disintegrating into a cacophony of worn out mechanics.
-terrytwitter.com/7Electrons
  • Alberto Tadiello joins us on 7E
Alberto is an Italian audio/electronic installation artist. He creates various autonomous sonic machines and installations that at some point undergo a climactic state. ”I’m interested in creating a physical experience without implicating a physical contact,” he says. “What I want is to make something epidermic that borders visual and auditory sensations, becoming nearly tactile.” Alberto also uses aspects of sound like echo and resonance in his work. He says he wants people to “bring along the residue of what they saw, heard, and felt” after they experience his art.
EPROMs (Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) is an installation consisting of wiring, transformers and electric motors which drive music boxes. Like the limited use memory chips that inspired it’s name, the art piece eventually wears out and changes over time, starting out as a “fairy-like” soundscape and eventually disintegrating into a cacophony of worn out mechanics.
-terrytwitter.com/7Electrons
  • Alberto Tadiello joins us on 7E
Alberto is an Italian audio/electronic installation artist. He creates various autonomous sonic machines and installations that at some point undergo a climactic state. ”I’m interested in creating a physical experience without implicating a physical contact,” he says. “What I want is to make something epidermic that borders visual and auditory sensations, becoming nearly tactile.” Alberto also uses aspects of sound like echo and resonance in his work. He says he wants people to “bring along the residue of what they saw, heard, and felt” after they experience his art.
EPROMs (Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) is an installation consisting of wiring, transformers and electric motors which drive music boxes. Like the limited use memory chips that inspired it’s name, the art piece eventually wears out and changes over time, starting out as a “fairy-like” soundscape and eventually disintegrating into a cacophony of worn out mechanics.
-terrytwitter.com/7Electrons
  • Alberto Tadiello joins us on 7E
Alberto is an Italian audio/electronic installation artist. He creates various autonomous sonic machines and installations that at some point undergo a climactic state. ”I’m interested in creating a physical experience without implicating a physical contact,” he says. “What I want is to make something epidermic that borders visual and auditory sensations, becoming nearly tactile.” Alberto also uses aspects of sound like echo and resonance in his work. He says he wants people to “bring along the residue of what they saw, heard, and felt” after they experience his art.
EPROMs (Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) is an installation consisting of wiring, transformers and electric motors which drive music boxes. Like the limited use memory chips that inspired it’s name, the art piece eventually wears out and changes over time, starting out as a “fairy-like” soundscape and eventually disintegrating into a cacophony of worn out mechanics.
-terrytwitter.com/7Electrons
  • Alberto Tadiello joins us on 7E
Alberto is an Italian audio/electronic installation artist. He creates various autonomous sonic machines and installations that at some point undergo a climactic state. ”I’m interested in creating a physical experience without implicating a physical contact,” he says. “What I want is to make something epidermic that borders visual and auditory sensations, becoming nearly tactile.” Alberto also uses aspects of sound like echo and resonance in his work. He says he wants people to “bring along the residue of what they saw, heard, and felt” after they experience his art.
EPROMs (Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) is an installation consisting of wiring, transformers and electric motors which drive music boxes. Like the limited use memory chips that inspired it’s name, the art piece eventually wears out and changes over time, starting out as a “fairy-like” soundscape and eventually disintegrating into a cacophony of worn out mechanics.
-terrytwitter.com/7Electrons
  • Alberto Tadiello joins us on 7E
Alberto is an Italian audio/electronic installation artist. He creates various autonomous sonic machines and installations that at some point undergo a climactic state. ”I’m interested in creating a physical experience without implicating a physical contact,” he says. “What I want is to make something epidermic that borders visual and auditory sensations, becoming nearly tactile.” Alberto also uses aspects of sound like echo and resonance in his work. He says he wants people to “bring along the residue of what they saw, heard, and felt” after they experience his art.
EPROMs (Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) is an installation consisting of wiring, transformers and electric motors which drive music boxes. Like the limited use memory chips that inspired it’s name, the art piece eventually wears out and changes over time, starting out as a “fairy-like” soundscape and eventually disintegrating into a cacophony of worn out mechanics.
-terrytwitter.com/7Electrons
  • Alberto Tadiello joins us on 7E
Alberto is an Italian audio/electronic installation artist. He creates various autonomous sonic machines and installations that at some point undergo a climactic state. ”I’m interested in creating a physical experience without implicating a physical contact,” he says. “What I want is to make something epidermic that borders visual and auditory sensations, becoming nearly tactile.” Alberto also uses aspects of sound like echo and resonance in his work. He says he wants people to “bring along the residue of what they saw, heard, and felt” after they experience his art.
EPROMs (Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) is an installation consisting of wiring, transformers and electric motors which drive music boxes. Like the limited use memory chips that inspired it’s name, the art piece eventually wears out and changes over time, starting out as a “fairy-like” soundscape and eventually disintegrating into a cacophony of worn out mechanics.
-terrytwitter.com/7Electrons
  • Alberto Tadiello joins us on 7E
Alberto is an Italian audio/electronic installation artist. He creates various autonomous sonic machines and installations that at some point undergo a climactic state. ”I’m interested in creating a physical experience without implicating a physical contact,” he says. “What I want is to make something epidermic that borders visual and auditory sensations, becoming nearly tactile.” Alberto also uses aspects of sound like echo and resonance in his work. He says he wants people to “bring along the residue of what they saw, heard, and felt” after they experience his art.
EPROMs (Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) is an installation consisting of wiring, transformers and electric motors which drive music boxes. Like the limited use memory chips that inspired it’s name, the art piece eventually wears out and changes over time, starting out as a “fairy-like” soundscape and eventually disintegrating into a cacophony of worn out mechanics.
-terrytwitter.com/7Electrons
  • Alberto Tadiello joins us on 7E
Alberto is an Italian audio/electronic installation artist. He creates various autonomous sonic machines and installations that at some point undergo a climactic state. ”I’m interested in creating a physical experience without implicating a physical contact,” he says. “What I want is to make something epidermic that borders visual and auditory sensations, becoming nearly tactile.” Alberto also uses aspects of sound like echo and resonance in his work. He says he wants people to “bring along the residue of what they saw, heard, and felt” after they experience his art.
EPROMs (Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) is an installation consisting of wiring, transformers and electric motors which drive music boxes. Like the limited use memory chips that inspired it’s name, the art piece eventually wears out and changes over time, starting out as a “fairy-like” soundscape and eventually disintegrating into a cacophony of worn out mechanics.
-terrytwitter.com/7Electrons

Alberto Tadiello joins us on 7E

Alberto is an Italian audio/electronic installation artist. He creates various autonomous sonic machines and installations that at some point undergo a climactic state. ”I’m interested in creating a physical experience without implicating a physical contact,” he says. “What I want is to make something epidermic that borders visual and auditory sensations, becoming nearly tactile.” Alberto also uses aspects of sound like echo and resonance in his work. He says he wants people to “bring along the residue of what they saw, heard, and felt” after they experience his art.

EPROMs (Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) is an installation consisting of wiring, transformers and electric motors which drive music boxes. Like the limited use memory chips that inspired it’s name, the art piece eventually wears out and changes over time, starting out as a “fairy-like” soundscape and eventually disintegrating into a cacophony of worn out mechanics.

-terry
twitter.com/7Electrons

  • 7E Guest Artist -  Erwin Redl
An artist originally from Austria, Erwin Redl now hails from Bowling Green, Ohio. His art primarily utilizes LEDs as a medium. Erwin also once studied electronic music and composition at the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna, which brings him way up on the Y axis for me. His Matrix VI graced the facade of the Whitney Museum in New York for it’s 2002 biennial celebration. One of my favorite works is Planes, which was first exhibited at the MoMA in Queens NY in 1997. Erwin is an innovator in electronic installation art, bridging electronics with the world of fine arts.
Thanks Erwin for joining us on 7E.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
  • 7E Guest Artist -  Erwin Redl
An artist originally from Austria, Erwin Redl now hails from Bowling Green, Ohio. His art primarily utilizes LEDs as a medium. Erwin also once studied electronic music and composition at the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna, which brings him way up on the Y axis for me. His Matrix VI graced the facade of the Whitney Museum in New York for it’s 2002 biennial celebration. One of my favorite works is Planes, which was first exhibited at the MoMA in Queens NY in 1997. Erwin is an innovator in electronic installation art, bridging electronics with the world of fine arts.
Thanks Erwin for joining us on 7E.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
  • 7E Guest Artist -  Erwin Redl
An artist originally from Austria, Erwin Redl now hails from Bowling Green, Ohio. His art primarily utilizes LEDs as a medium. Erwin also once studied electronic music and composition at the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna, which brings him way up on the Y axis for me. His Matrix VI graced the facade of the Whitney Museum in New York for it’s 2002 biennial celebration. One of my favorite works is Planes, which was first exhibited at the MoMA in Queens NY in 1997. Erwin is an innovator in electronic installation art, bridging electronics with the world of fine arts.
Thanks Erwin for joining us on 7E.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
  • 7E Guest Artist -  Erwin Redl
An artist originally from Austria, Erwin Redl now hails from Bowling Green, Ohio. His art primarily utilizes LEDs as a medium. Erwin also once studied electronic music and composition at the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna, which brings him way up on the Y axis for me. His Matrix VI graced the facade of the Whitney Museum in New York for it’s 2002 biennial celebration. One of my favorite works is Planes, which was first exhibited at the MoMA in Queens NY in 1997. Erwin is an innovator in electronic installation art, bridging electronics with the world of fine arts.
Thanks Erwin for joining us on 7E.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
  • 7E Guest Artist -  Erwin Redl
An artist originally from Austria, Erwin Redl now hails from Bowling Green, Ohio. His art primarily utilizes LEDs as a medium. Erwin also once studied electronic music and composition at the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna, which brings him way up on the Y axis for me. His Matrix VI graced the facade of the Whitney Museum in New York for it’s 2002 biennial celebration. One of my favorite works is Planes, which was first exhibited at the MoMA in Queens NY in 1997. Erwin is an innovator in electronic installation art, bridging electronics with the world of fine arts.
Thanks Erwin for joining us on 7E.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
  • 7E Guest Artist -  Erwin Redl
An artist originally from Austria, Erwin Redl now hails from Bowling Green, Ohio. His art primarily utilizes LEDs as a medium. Erwin also once studied electronic music and composition at the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna, which brings him way up on the Y axis for me. His Matrix VI graced the facade of the Whitney Museum in New York for it’s 2002 biennial celebration. One of my favorite works is Planes, which was first exhibited at the MoMA in Queens NY in 1997. Erwin is an innovator in electronic installation art, bridging electronics with the world of fine arts.
Thanks Erwin for joining us on 7E.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
  • 7E Guest Artist -  Erwin Redl
An artist originally from Austria, Erwin Redl now hails from Bowling Green, Ohio. His art primarily utilizes LEDs as a medium. Erwin also once studied electronic music and composition at the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna, which brings him way up on the Y axis for me. His Matrix VI graced the facade of the Whitney Museum in New York for it’s 2002 biennial celebration. One of my favorite works is Planes, which was first exhibited at the MoMA in Queens NY in 1997. Erwin is an innovator in electronic installation art, bridging electronics with the world of fine arts.
Thanks Erwin for joining us on 7E.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
  • 7E Guest Artist -  Erwin Redl
An artist originally from Austria, Erwin Redl now hails from Bowling Green, Ohio. His art primarily utilizes LEDs as a medium. Erwin also once studied electronic music and composition at the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna, which brings him way up on the Y axis for me. His Matrix VI graced the facade of the Whitney Museum in New York for it’s 2002 biennial celebration. One of my favorite works is Planes, which was first exhibited at the MoMA in Queens NY in 1997. Erwin is an innovator in electronic installation art, bridging electronics with the world of fine arts.
Thanks Erwin for joining us on 7E.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons

7E Guest Artist -  Erwin Redl

An artist originally from Austria, Erwin Redl now hails from Bowling Green, Ohio. His art primarily utilizes LEDs as a medium. Erwin also once studied electronic music and composition at the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna, which brings him way up on the Y axis for me. His Matrix VI graced the facade of the Whitney Museum in New York for it’s 2002 biennial celebration. One of my favorite works is Planes, which was first exhibited at the MoMA in Queens NY in 1997. Erwin is an innovator in electronic installation art, bridging electronics with the world of fine arts.

Thanks Erwin for joining us on 7E.

-terry
twitter.com/7electrons

  • 7E Guest Artist - Peter Vogel :: Godfather of electronic sculpture
Peter Vogel is a truly innovative German artist born in 1937. He  pioneered the idea of turning circuits into sculptures. Formally trained in physics, Peter says his works are “dependent on an active observer” and that “form follows function.” In the ’60s, he became interested in early electronic music experiments with, synthesizers, tape loops and musique concrète. And, in the late ’70s he started experimenting with sound structures which are “walls of sound” consisting of electronic components, speakers, and sometimes sensors and synthesizers which react to the viewer.
What a beautiful aesthetic created from electronic components that all of us take for granted daily. We love Peter’s work!
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
**additional photos by Aaron Meyers, svennevenn, and Daniel Bagel. licensed under the creative commons.
  • 7E Guest Artist - Peter Vogel :: Godfather of electronic sculpture
Peter Vogel is a truly innovative German artist born in 1937. He  pioneered the idea of turning circuits into sculptures. Formally trained in physics, Peter says his works are “dependent on an active observer” and that “form follows function.” In the ’60s, he became interested in early electronic music experiments with, synthesizers, tape loops and musique concrète. And, in the late ’70s he started experimenting with sound structures which are “walls of sound” consisting of electronic components, speakers, and sometimes sensors and synthesizers which react to the viewer.
What a beautiful aesthetic created from electronic components that all of us take for granted daily. We love Peter’s work!
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
**additional photos by Aaron Meyers, svennevenn, and Daniel Bagel. licensed under the creative commons.
  • 7E Guest Artist - Peter Vogel :: Godfather of electronic sculpture
Peter Vogel is a truly innovative German artist born in 1937. He  pioneered the idea of turning circuits into sculptures. Formally trained in physics, Peter says his works are “dependent on an active observer” and that “form follows function.” In the ’60s, he became interested in early electronic music experiments with, synthesizers, tape loops and musique concrète. And, in the late ’70s he started experimenting with sound structures which are “walls of sound” consisting of electronic components, speakers, and sometimes sensors and synthesizers which react to the viewer.
What a beautiful aesthetic created from electronic components that all of us take for granted daily. We love Peter’s work!
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
**additional photos by Aaron Meyers, svennevenn, and Daniel Bagel. licensed under the creative commons.
  • 7E Guest Artist - Peter Vogel :: Godfather of electronic sculpture
Peter Vogel is a truly innovative German artist born in 1937. He  pioneered the idea of turning circuits into sculptures. Formally trained in physics, Peter says his works are “dependent on an active observer” and that “form follows function.” In the ’60s, he became interested in early electronic music experiments with, synthesizers, tape loops and musique concrète. And, in the late ’70s he started experimenting with sound structures which are “walls of sound” consisting of electronic components, speakers, and sometimes sensors and synthesizers which react to the viewer.
What a beautiful aesthetic created from electronic components that all of us take for granted daily. We love Peter’s work!
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
**additional photos by Aaron Meyers, svennevenn, and Daniel Bagel. licensed under the creative commons.
  • 7E Guest Artist - Peter Vogel :: Godfather of electronic sculpture
Peter Vogel is a truly innovative German artist born in 1937. He  pioneered the idea of turning circuits into sculptures. Formally trained in physics, Peter says his works are “dependent on an active observer” and that “form follows function.” In the ’60s, he became interested in early electronic music experiments with, synthesizers, tape loops and musique concrète. And, in the late ’70s he started experimenting with sound structures which are “walls of sound” consisting of electronic components, speakers, and sometimes sensors and synthesizers which react to the viewer.
What a beautiful aesthetic created from electronic components that all of us take for granted daily. We love Peter’s work!
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
**additional photos by Aaron Meyers, svennevenn, and Daniel Bagel. licensed under the creative commons.
  • 7E Guest Artist - Peter Vogel :: Godfather of electronic sculpture
Peter Vogel is a truly innovative German artist born in 1937. He  pioneered the idea of turning circuits into sculptures. Formally trained in physics, Peter says his works are “dependent on an active observer” and that “form follows function.” In the ’60s, he became interested in early electronic music experiments with, synthesizers, tape loops and musique concrète. And, in the late ’70s he started experimenting with sound structures which are “walls of sound” consisting of electronic components, speakers, and sometimes sensors and synthesizers which react to the viewer.
What a beautiful aesthetic created from electronic components that all of us take for granted daily. We love Peter’s work!
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
**additional photos by Aaron Meyers, svennevenn, and Daniel Bagel. licensed under the creative commons.
  • 7E Guest Artist - Peter Vogel :: Godfather of electronic sculpture
Peter Vogel is a truly innovative German artist born in 1937. He  pioneered the idea of turning circuits into sculptures. Formally trained in physics, Peter says his works are “dependent on an active observer” and that “form follows function.” In the ’60s, he became interested in early electronic music experiments with, synthesizers, tape loops and musique concrète. And, in the late ’70s he started experimenting with sound structures which are “walls of sound” consisting of electronic components, speakers, and sometimes sensors and synthesizers which react to the viewer.
What a beautiful aesthetic created from electronic components that all of us take for granted daily. We love Peter’s work!
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
**additional photos by Aaron Meyers, svennevenn, and Daniel Bagel. licensed under the creative commons.
  • 7E Guest Artist - Peter Vogel :: Godfather of electronic sculpture
Peter Vogel is a truly innovative German artist born in 1937. He  pioneered the idea of turning circuits into sculptures. Formally trained in physics, Peter says his works are “dependent on an active observer” and that “form follows function.” In the ’60s, he became interested in early electronic music experiments with, synthesizers, tape loops and musique concrète. And, in the late ’70s he started experimenting with sound structures which are “walls of sound” consisting of electronic components, speakers, and sometimes sensors and synthesizers which react to the viewer.
What a beautiful aesthetic created from electronic components that all of us take for granted daily. We love Peter’s work!
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
**additional photos by Aaron Meyers, svennevenn, and Daniel Bagel. licensed under the creative commons.
  • 7E Guest Artist - Peter Vogel :: Godfather of electronic sculpture
Peter Vogel is a truly innovative German artist born in 1937. He  pioneered the idea of turning circuits into sculptures. Formally trained in physics, Peter says his works are “dependent on an active observer” and that “form follows function.” In the ’60s, he became interested in early electronic music experiments with, synthesizers, tape loops and musique concrète. And, in the late ’70s he started experimenting with sound structures which are “walls of sound” consisting of electronic components, speakers, and sometimes sensors and synthesizers which react to the viewer.
What a beautiful aesthetic created from electronic components that all of us take for granted daily. We love Peter’s work!
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
**additional photos by Aaron Meyers, svennevenn, and Daniel Bagel. licensed under the creative commons.

7E Guest Artist - Peter Vogel :: Godfather of electronic sculpture

Peter Vogel is a truly innovative German artist born in 1937. He  pioneered the idea of turning circuits into sculptures. Formally trained in physics, Peter says his works are “dependent on an active observer” and that “form follows function.” In the ’60s, he became interested in early electronic music experiments with, synthesizers, tape loops and musique concrète. And, in the late ’70s he started experimenting with sound structures which are “walls of sound” consisting of electronic components, speakers, and sometimes sensors and synthesizers which react to the viewer.

What a beautiful aesthetic created from electronic components that all of us take for granted daily. We love Peter’s work!

-terry
twitter.com/7electrons

**additional photos by Aaron Meyers, svennevenn, and Daniel Bagel. licensed under the creative commons.

  • 7E Guest Artist - Marius Watz
Marius Watz is a New York/Oslo based artist and coder “working with visual abstraction through generative software processes.” What this means is that he creates software generated artwork.  He creates pure software works, public projections and physical objects produced with digital fabrication technology.  I’ve mentioned several times in past 7E articles that I have an affinity to art that consist of fine lines.  His geometric forms are complex yet delicate in nature like impressive and gorgeous spiderwebs.  My favorite is his Arc Drawing #1-2.  
Both Terry and I are great big fans of Marius’ work so we are honored he joined 7E.  Beautiful work Marius. :)
-Jinna
  • 7E Guest Artist - Marius Watz
Marius Watz is a New York/Oslo based artist and coder “working with visual abstraction through generative software processes.” What this means is that he creates software generated artwork.  He creates pure software works, public projections and physical objects produced with digital fabrication technology.  I’ve mentioned several times in past 7E articles that I have an affinity to art that consist of fine lines.  His geometric forms are complex yet delicate in nature like impressive and gorgeous spiderwebs.  My favorite is his Arc Drawing #1-2.  
Both Terry and I are great big fans of Marius’ work so we are honored he joined 7E.  Beautiful work Marius. :)
-Jinna
  • 7E Guest Artist - Marius Watz
Marius Watz is a New York/Oslo based artist and coder “working with visual abstraction through generative software processes.” What this means is that he creates software generated artwork.  He creates pure software works, public projections and physical objects produced with digital fabrication technology.  I’ve mentioned several times in past 7E articles that I have an affinity to art that consist of fine lines.  His geometric forms are complex yet delicate in nature like impressive and gorgeous spiderwebs.  My favorite is his Arc Drawing #1-2.  
Both Terry and I are great big fans of Marius’ work so we are honored he joined 7E.  Beautiful work Marius. :)
-Jinna
  • 7E Guest Artist - Marius Watz
Marius Watz is a New York/Oslo based artist and coder “working with visual abstraction through generative software processes.” What this means is that he creates software generated artwork.  He creates pure software works, public projections and physical objects produced with digital fabrication technology.  I’ve mentioned several times in past 7E articles that I have an affinity to art that consist of fine lines.  His geometric forms are complex yet delicate in nature like impressive and gorgeous spiderwebs.  My favorite is his Arc Drawing #1-2.  
Both Terry and I are great big fans of Marius’ work so we are honored he joined 7E.  Beautiful work Marius. :)
-Jinna
  • 7E Guest Artist - Marius Watz
Marius Watz is a New York/Oslo based artist and coder “working with visual abstraction through generative software processes.” What this means is that he creates software generated artwork.  He creates pure software works, public projections and physical objects produced with digital fabrication technology.  I’ve mentioned several times in past 7E articles that I have an affinity to art that consist of fine lines.  His geometric forms are complex yet delicate in nature like impressive and gorgeous spiderwebs.  My favorite is his Arc Drawing #1-2.  
Both Terry and I are great big fans of Marius’ work so we are honored he joined 7E.  Beautiful work Marius. :)
-Jinna
  • 7E Guest Artist - Marius Watz
Marius Watz is a New York/Oslo based artist and coder “working with visual abstraction through generative software processes.” What this means is that he creates software generated artwork.  He creates pure software works, public projections and physical objects produced with digital fabrication technology.  I’ve mentioned several times in past 7E articles that I have an affinity to art that consist of fine lines.  His geometric forms are complex yet delicate in nature like impressive and gorgeous spiderwebs.  My favorite is his Arc Drawing #1-2.  
Both Terry and I are great big fans of Marius’ work so we are honored he joined 7E.  Beautiful work Marius. :)
-Jinna
  • 7E Guest Artist - Marius Watz
Marius Watz is a New York/Oslo based artist and coder “working with visual abstraction through generative software processes.” What this means is that he creates software generated artwork.  He creates pure software works, public projections and physical objects produced with digital fabrication technology.  I’ve mentioned several times in past 7E articles that I have an affinity to art that consist of fine lines.  His geometric forms are complex yet delicate in nature like impressive and gorgeous spiderwebs.  My favorite is his Arc Drawing #1-2.  
Both Terry and I are great big fans of Marius’ work so we are honored he joined 7E.  Beautiful work Marius. :)
-Jinna
  • 7E Guest Artist - Marius Watz
Marius Watz is a New York/Oslo based artist and coder “working with visual abstraction through generative software processes.” What this means is that he creates software generated artwork.  He creates pure software works, public projections and physical objects produced with digital fabrication technology.  I’ve mentioned several times in past 7E articles that I have an affinity to art that consist of fine lines.  His geometric forms are complex yet delicate in nature like impressive and gorgeous spiderwebs.  My favorite is his Arc Drawing #1-2.  
Both Terry and I are great big fans of Marius’ work so we are honored he joined 7E.  Beautiful work Marius. :)
-Jinna
  • 7E Guest Artist - Marius Watz
Marius Watz is a New York/Oslo based artist and coder “working with visual abstraction through generative software processes.” What this means is that he creates software generated artwork.  He creates pure software works, public projections and physical objects produced with digital fabrication technology.  I’ve mentioned several times in past 7E articles that I have an affinity to art that consist of fine lines.  His geometric forms are complex yet delicate in nature like impressive and gorgeous spiderwebs.  My favorite is his Arc Drawing #1-2.  
Both Terry and I are great big fans of Marius’ work so we are honored he joined 7E.  Beautiful work Marius. :)
-Jinna
  • 7E Guest Artist - Marius Watz
Marius Watz is a New York/Oslo based artist and coder “working with visual abstraction through generative software processes.” What this means is that he creates software generated artwork.  He creates pure software works, public projections and physical objects produced with digital fabrication technology.  I’ve mentioned several times in past 7E articles that I have an affinity to art that consist of fine lines.  His geometric forms are complex yet delicate in nature like impressive and gorgeous spiderwebs.  My favorite is his Arc Drawing #1-2.  
Both Terry and I are great big fans of Marius’ work so we are honored he joined 7E.  Beautiful work Marius. :)
-Jinna

7E Guest Artist - Marius Watz

Marius Watz is a New York/Oslo based artist and coder “working with visual abstraction through generative software processes.” What this means is that he creates software generated artwork.  He creates pure software works, public projections and physical objects produced with digital fabrication technology.  I’ve mentioned several times in past 7E articles that I have an affinity to art that consist of fine lines.  His geometric forms are complex yet delicate in nature like impressive and gorgeous spiderwebs.  My favorite is his Arc Drawing #1-2.  

Both Terry and I are great big fans of Marius’ work so we are honored he joined 7E.  Beautiful work Marius. :)

-Jinna

  • 7E Guest Artist - Zimoun
Zimoun is an artist from Bern, Switzerland most well known for his work with sound installations and sculptures. He often incorporates generated sound as an element of the piece through electro mechanical means, for example, by utilizing objects attached to multiple DC motors. The sounds  evoke the noise of a whirring civilization, a busy factory, or even rainfall. My favorite synthesis is from "216 prepared dc-motors, filler wire 1.0mm" which to me sounds like rain with an ominous undertone.
Be sure to watch his videos below for the full experience:

Zimoun : Compilation Video 3.1 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.

Zimoun : 329 prepared dc-motors, cotton balls, toluene tank, 2013 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
  • 7E Guest Artist - Zimoun
Zimoun is an artist from Bern, Switzerland most well known for his work with sound installations and sculptures. He often incorporates generated sound as an element of the piece through electro mechanical means, for example, by utilizing objects attached to multiple DC motors. The sounds  evoke the noise of a whirring civilization, a busy factory, or even rainfall. My favorite synthesis is from "216 prepared dc-motors, filler wire 1.0mm" which to me sounds like rain with an ominous undertone.
Be sure to watch his videos below for the full experience:

Zimoun : Compilation Video 3.1 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.

Zimoun : 329 prepared dc-motors, cotton balls, toluene tank, 2013 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
  • 7E Guest Artist - Zimoun
Zimoun is an artist from Bern, Switzerland most well known for his work with sound installations and sculptures. He often incorporates generated sound as an element of the piece through electro mechanical means, for example, by utilizing objects attached to multiple DC motors. The sounds  evoke the noise of a whirring civilization, a busy factory, or even rainfall. My favorite synthesis is from "216 prepared dc-motors, filler wire 1.0mm" which to me sounds like rain with an ominous undertone.
Be sure to watch his videos below for the full experience:

Zimoun : Compilation Video 3.1 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.

Zimoun : 329 prepared dc-motors, cotton balls, toluene tank, 2013 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
  • 7E Guest Artist - Zimoun
Zimoun is an artist from Bern, Switzerland most well known for his work with sound installations and sculptures. He often incorporates generated sound as an element of the piece through electro mechanical means, for example, by utilizing objects attached to multiple DC motors. The sounds  evoke the noise of a whirring civilization, a busy factory, or even rainfall. My favorite synthesis is from "216 prepared dc-motors, filler wire 1.0mm" which to me sounds like rain with an ominous undertone.
Be sure to watch his videos below for the full experience:

Zimoun : Compilation Video 3.1 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.

Zimoun : 329 prepared dc-motors, cotton balls, toluene tank, 2013 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
  • 7E Guest Artist - Zimoun
Zimoun is an artist from Bern, Switzerland most well known for his work with sound installations and sculptures. He often incorporates generated sound as an element of the piece through electro mechanical means, for example, by utilizing objects attached to multiple DC motors. The sounds  evoke the noise of a whirring civilization, a busy factory, or even rainfall. My favorite synthesis is from "216 prepared dc-motors, filler wire 1.0mm" which to me sounds like rain with an ominous undertone.
Be sure to watch his videos below for the full experience:

Zimoun : Compilation Video 3.1 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.

Zimoun : 329 prepared dc-motors, cotton balls, toluene tank, 2013 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
  • 7E Guest Artist - Zimoun
Zimoun is an artist from Bern, Switzerland most well known for his work with sound installations and sculptures. He often incorporates generated sound as an element of the piece through electro mechanical means, for example, by utilizing objects attached to multiple DC motors. The sounds  evoke the noise of a whirring civilization, a busy factory, or even rainfall. My favorite synthesis is from "216 prepared dc-motors, filler wire 1.0mm" which to me sounds like rain with an ominous undertone.
Be sure to watch his videos below for the full experience:

Zimoun : Compilation Video 3.1 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.

Zimoun : 329 prepared dc-motors, cotton balls, toluene tank, 2013 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
  • 7E Guest Artist - Zimoun
Zimoun is an artist from Bern, Switzerland most well known for his work with sound installations and sculptures. He often incorporates generated sound as an element of the piece through electro mechanical means, for example, by utilizing objects attached to multiple DC motors. The sounds  evoke the noise of a whirring civilization, a busy factory, or even rainfall. My favorite synthesis is from "216 prepared dc-motors, filler wire 1.0mm" which to me sounds like rain with an ominous undertone.
Be sure to watch his videos below for the full experience:

Zimoun : Compilation Video 3.1 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.

Zimoun : 329 prepared dc-motors, cotton balls, toluene tank, 2013 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons
  • 7E Guest Artist - Zimoun
Zimoun is an artist from Bern, Switzerland most well known for his work with sound installations and sculptures. He often incorporates generated sound as an element of the piece through electro mechanical means, for example, by utilizing objects attached to multiple DC motors. The sounds  evoke the noise of a whirring civilization, a busy factory, or even rainfall. My favorite synthesis is from "216 prepared dc-motors, filler wire 1.0mm" which to me sounds like rain with an ominous undertone.
Be sure to watch his videos below for the full experience:

Zimoun : Compilation Video 3.1 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.

Zimoun : 329 prepared dc-motors, cotton balls, toluene tank, 2013 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.
-terrytwitter.com/7electrons

7E Guest Artist - Zimoun

Zimoun is an artist from Bern, Switzerland most well known for his work with sound installations and sculptures. He often incorporates generated sound as an element of the piece through electro mechanical means, for example, by utilizing objects attached to multiple DC motors. The sounds  evoke the noise of a whirring civilization, a busy factory, or even rainfall. My favorite synthesis is from "216 prepared dc-motors, filler wire 1.0mm" which to me sounds like rain with an ominous undertone.

Be sure to watch his videos below for the full experience:

Zimoun : Compilation Video 3.1 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.

Zimoun : 329 prepared dc-motors, cotton balls, toluene tank, 2013 from STUDIO ZIMOUN on Vimeo.

-terry
twitter.com/7electrons

  • 7E Guest Designer - Mark McKeague
Mark converts traffic road noise in Westminister, London into electronic sounds. Named “City Symphonies”, each car is spatialized using binaural audio techniques via IRCAM Forum Studio software (http://forumnet.ircam.fr). 3D location of the sound is created while cars generate electronic sound effects depending on their interaction to the environment.  He also utilizes Processing and Max/MSP.  
To me, it sounds like mysterious robotic whales communicating under water. Watch City Symphonies - Westminster from Mark McKeague.

Mark is a technical designer based in London who is also a cofounder of Dentaku, a creative design and invention studio.   Thanks Mark for joining 7E!
  • 7E Guest Designer - Mark McKeague
Mark converts traffic road noise in Westminister, London into electronic sounds. Named “City Symphonies”, each car is spatialized using binaural audio techniques via IRCAM Forum Studio software (http://forumnet.ircam.fr). 3D location of the sound is created while cars generate electronic sound effects depending on their interaction to the environment.  He also utilizes Processing and Max/MSP.  
To me, it sounds like mysterious robotic whales communicating under water. Watch City Symphonies - Westminster from Mark McKeague.

Mark is a technical designer based in London who is also a cofounder of Dentaku, a creative design and invention studio.   Thanks Mark for joining 7E!
  • 7E Guest Designer - Mark McKeague
Mark converts traffic road noise in Westminister, London into electronic sounds. Named “City Symphonies”, each car is spatialized using binaural audio techniques via IRCAM Forum Studio software (http://forumnet.ircam.fr). 3D location of the sound is created while cars generate electronic sound effects depending on their interaction to the environment.  He also utilizes Processing and Max/MSP.  
To me, it sounds like mysterious robotic whales communicating under water. Watch City Symphonies - Westminster from Mark McKeague.

Mark is a technical designer based in London who is also a cofounder of Dentaku, a creative design and invention studio.   Thanks Mark for joining 7E!
  • 7E Guest Designer - Mark McKeague
Mark converts traffic road noise in Westminister, London into electronic sounds. Named “City Symphonies”, each car is spatialized using binaural audio techniques via IRCAM Forum Studio software (http://forumnet.ircam.fr). 3D location of the sound is created while cars generate electronic sound effects depending on their interaction to the environment.  He also utilizes Processing and Max/MSP.  
To me, it sounds like mysterious robotic whales communicating under water. Watch City Symphonies - Westminster from Mark McKeague.

Mark is a technical designer based in London who is also a cofounder of Dentaku, a creative design and invention studio.   Thanks Mark for joining 7E!
  • 7E Guest Designer - Mark McKeague
Mark converts traffic road noise in Westminister, London into electronic sounds. Named “City Symphonies”, each car is spatialized using binaural audio techniques via IRCAM Forum Studio software (http://forumnet.ircam.fr). 3D location of the sound is created while cars generate electronic sound effects depending on their interaction to the environment.  He also utilizes Processing and Max/MSP.  
To me, it sounds like mysterious robotic whales communicating under water. Watch City Symphonies - Westminster from Mark McKeague.

Mark is a technical designer based in London who is also a cofounder of Dentaku, a creative design and invention studio.   Thanks Mark for joining 7E!
  • 7E Guest Designer - Mark McKeague
Mark converts traffic road noise in Westminister, London into electronic sounds. Named “City Symphonies”, each car is spatialized using binaural audio techniques via IRCAM Forum Studio software (http://forumnet.ircam.fr). 3D location of the sound is created while cars generate electronic sound effects depending on their interaction to the environment.  He also utilizes Processing and Max/MSP.  
To me, it sounds like mysterious robotic whales communicating under water. Watch City Symphonies - Westminster from Mark McKeague.

Mark is a technical designer based in London who is also a cofounder of Dentaku, a creative design and invention studio.   Thanks Mark for joining 7E!
  • 7E Guest Designer - Mark McKeague
Mark converts traffic road noise in Westminister, London into electronic sounds. Named “City Symphonies”, each car is spatialized using binaural audio techniques via IRCAM Forum Studio software (http://forumnet.ircam.fr). 3D location of the sound is created while cars generate electronic sound effects depending on their interaction to the environment.  He also utilizes Processing and Max/MSP.  
To me, it sounds like mysterious robotic whales communicating under water. Watch City Symphonies - Westminster from Mark McKeague.

Mark is a technical designer based in London who is also a cofounder of Dentaku, a creative design and invention studio.   Thanks Mark for joining 7E!

7E Guest Designer - Mark McKeague

Mark converts traffic road noise in Westminister, London into electronic sounds. Named “City Symphonies”, each car is spatialized using binaural audio techniques via IRCAM Forum Studio software (http://forumnet.ircam.fr). 3D location of the sound is created while cars generate electronic sound effects depending on their interaction to the environment.  He also utilizes Processing and Max/MSP.  

To me, it sounds like mysterious robotic whales communicating under water. Watch City Symphonies - Westminster from Mark McKeague.

Mark is a technical designer based in London who is also a cofounder of Dentaku, a creative design and invention studio.   Thanks Mark for joining 7E!

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